Reading Buildings – Reading History: Integrating Literacy Skills through Historical Building Analysis

| October 1, 2015

October 17 & 23 2015

Two Day Workshop

Saturday, 10/17/15:  9am – 6pm
Friday, 10/23/15:  5pm – 7pm
 
Registration

Regular registration fee: $220
Student Rate: $165

Click here to register!

Overview

While many social studies and language arts teachers are familiar with using close reading strategies for historical thinking related to documents, traditional text can serve as a barrier for students who struggle with reading, particularly students with language-based learning disabilities or are non-native English speakers. In this workshop, participants will learn how to develop historical thinking skills through the analysis of historical buildings. We will draw upon literacy theory and practice to show how the process of historical building analysis supports students’ development of higher order thinking skills and meets CCSS standards.

 

Faculty

Christine Baron – Assistant Professor Social Studies and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, is a former high school history teacher and museum educator.

Immediately prior to her academic post, Dr. Baron directed the development of educational and interpretation programs at the Old North Church, Boston. Dr. Baron’s research focuses on using museums and historic sites as laboratories for history teacher education. Her related interests include examining historical thinking related to non-traditional texts and teaching and learning in informal settings. She has been recognized by the National Council on Public History American Association of State and Local History, and the National Council on the Social Studies her research related to using historic sites to foster historical thinking.

Christina Dobbs – Clinical Assistant Professor in English Education.

She completed her doctoral studies in Human Development and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, completing her dissertation about the academic language writing of middle graders. Her research interests include academic language development, the argumentative writing of students, and writing instruction. She has served as an adjunct instructor at Lesley University, Hunter College, Simmons College, and Salem State University and as a consultant for the Cambridge Public Schools, Boston Public Schools, and Concord School District in New Hampshire. She served as the Manuscripts Editor for the Harvard Educational Review, and she edited a volume titled Humanizing Education: Critical Alternatives to Reform. She is a former high school teacher in Houston, Texas, as well as a literacy coach, and reading specialist.